The Legend


This cave painting appears to be the first depiction of six immortal men whose immortality stemmed from this incident.The central figure has been known as a savage, a bloodthirsty conqueror, and a killer of his brother men. The other five men are the focus here, the two curious bystanders more so than the fleeing three men. You may be able to identify these men when I say that the three men from the other tribe were all rather short. One had a shaven head due to a ritual whose origins are lost in time, another was balding but with large tufts of hair on either side of his head, the last had a haircut that would one day be called the bowl haircut, also probably some ritualized style. Of course this information comes from other sources and cannot be seen from the cave painting. The two particular cavemen who are the subject of this group were ne'er-do-well's, probably low on the pecking order of their tribes and fairly inept at tool making or hunting. If it had not been for the falling meteorite that imbued them with immortality, they probably would have lived short violent lives. As Immortals they carried out this pattern of their lives. The pair was represented by numerous actors retelling their stories and jokes: Mutt and Jeff, Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble, Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello. But the originals were actually Ollu and Buzsla.
Dennis Power-ImmortalBefuddled at the Wold-Newton site

Unbeknownst to the active participants in the foreground, there were also four persons in the area nearby otherwise occupied. There was the tribe's chief Shaman, The Wizard of Ugghh (W. C. Fields), the number 2 Shaman at this time tied up on the ground and being readied for sacrifice, Old Tumnus (Buster Keaton) and the latter Shaman's daughter and granddaughter, Cedar and Willow. Quite by accident these people were also passively granted Immortality. The two women were known to wander into and out of Ollu and Buzsla's lives throughout the ages and they were represented in later times by such actresses as Thelma Todd, Hillary Brooke, Christine MacIntyre, Leslie Easterbrook and Bobbi Shaw for the large and imposing woman Cedar; and ZaSu Pitts, Betty Grable, Jean Harlow, Vera-Ellen, Dorothy Provine and Teri Copley as the slighter and slightly forlorn woman Willow. On the Flintstones, Willow was represented as Wilma, and the women were joined by another Immortal (actually the daughter of Hercules, it was said), the darker-haired Beech, Betty Rubble on the Flintstones, most notably shown on films as Clara Bow and in cartoons as Betty Boop. The Wizard of Ugghh was created by Joe Kubert for Tor comics. The characters of Old Tumnus (Tunka), Cedar, Willow and Beech are all the sole property of Dale A. Drinnon

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Willow at IMDB

In case you wondered, Willow does stories represented by Jean Harlow, Betty Grable, Vera-Ellen, Dorothy Provine, Teri Copley and sometimes Brigitte Bardot, as well as others, so her list of appearances is also quite lengthy. I shall be posting those lists also presently.

Willow is Wilma Flintstone: there is something about her face that is not really pretty and can seem a little disquieting to some people Her hair is a darker reddish-blonde (dishwater blonde) natually and down through the ages, but she picked up the habit of dyeing it blonde about the time of the Roman Empire. While Cedar is usually regarded as a beautiful singer primarily, Willow has a weak voice that can sound husky or even a little wheezy at times. But Willow is much the better dancer and has much higher energy to go at it for more sustained dancing and vigorous activity than most other people can endure. She can lose a lot of weight if she is not careful to keep eating enough: her figure ranges from lean to really painfully thin at times.Willow seems neurotic at times and occasionaly she really flips out and goes rogue until her friends to come back home and behave in a more civilised manner.She also has a tendancy to having dry skin and hair.
























http://ctva.biz/US/Crime/Roaring20s.htm








































Best Wishes, Dale D.

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